It’s just data

Life after Bug Tracking Systems

Avery Pennarun: The git developers don’t track bugs. If you find a bug, you can write about it on the mailing list. You might get flamed. And then probably someone will ask you to fix it yourself and send in a patch.  This is unlike almost all other open source projects.

Sometimes ideas take time to percolate.  When I first saw Avery’s post, it didn’t quite sink in.

When I started playing with hg, I noticed that I was applying a different style of development than I previously had done.  One that I felt more comfortable with.  And I thought again about Avery’s post.

And when I came across Chad Wooley’s comment: But using your SCM as a messaging platform?  Come on, that’s taking the social networking thing too far...  I pray that I never see the official Twitter channel for an open source project I care about, because I ain’t going there...; I once again thought about Avery’s post.

It now occurs to me that not all projects need bug tracking systems.  In fact, for some projects, not having a bug tracking system may very well be a feature.  In particular, if the bug tracking system on your project is the place where feedback goes to die, you might be better served not having one.  But if you do decide to go this way, you would be well served to consider one of the various DVCS systems out there, like bzr, hg, and git.


I disabled the bug tracking features of RubyForge for most of my projects.  I’d rather have people use GitHub or email to provide patches and feedback.  Bug tracking systems are where feedback goes to die on my projects.  Especially because RubyForge is really weird about when it decides to send me an email about an issue.  Many times I just don’t know that someone’s posted a bug.

Posted by Bob Aman at

github in fact is a social network based on git.

Posted by Slim Amamou at

[from rtomayko] Life after Bug Tracking Systems

Sam Ruby on how DVCS + mailing list has removed the need for bug tracking systems on some projects. I’m feeling a similar pull in my own work....

Excerpt from del.icio.us/network/ek1.618 at

[from chl] sam ruby: life after bug tracking systems

[link]...

Excerpt from del.icio.us/network/ek1.618 at

With DCVSes, you can also just keep track of bugs in the repository!

Make a file for each ticket, with filing in it’s own commit, and updates/closure committed along with the source code changes they correspond to.

There are a couple new projects out there trying to define a syntax + develop a web interface for this, but that’s just icing!

Posted by Fred Blasdel at

"if the bug tracking system on your project is the place where feedback goes to die, you might be better served not having one"

[link] [comments]...

Excerpt from programming: what's new online at

What kinds of projects benefit from only hearing about bugs with fixes?

Posted by ForgeDestiny at

I guess it depends on how you ask the question.

Another way to approach the question: at what point after I make available something for free and asis do I become obligated to provide support?

A valid terminal state for many personal projects is “works for me, if it works for you — great, but if it breaks, you get to keep both halves”.

Posted by Sam Ruby at

Bzr Bookmarks

Bookmarked your page with keywords bzr!... [more]

Trackback from Post Saver - Website voting and saving system

at

How to tell when your bug reporting system is at its limits

How to tell when your bug reporting system is at its limits There reaches a certain point in the life of many projects, especially open source projects, when your bug reporting system just doesn’t work any more. By ‘doesn’t work’ I don’t mean that...

Excerpt from Chris's Wiki :: blog at

github in fact is a social network based on git. I blog in code or code in the blog quote of the day via [link]...

Excerpt from Mariuz's Blog at

I was quite taken with Ditz, but have only “tried it” for a nonproject. [link]

Posted by Olle Jonsson at

Weird things about git, #2: no bug tracking system

( via Sam Ruby ) [link]...

Excerpt from nuclear powered soup at

Links for 2009-03-28 [del.icio.us]

Sam Ruby: Life after Bug Tracking Systems “In particular, if the bug tracking system on your project is the place where feedback goes to die, you might be better served not having one.” Oh yes....

Excerpt from Techbelly at

BTS, what is it really used for?

I found this blog entry by Sam Ruby titled Life After Bug Tracking Systems, interesting. Apparently other BTSs are frowned upon in some FOSS circles, Git for example, and it does make a point about the value proposition of BTSs in open source...

Excerpt from .liferc at

I think bugs shouldn’t be created by anyone. Bug should be reported via email, discussed to find out whether it’s a bug at all.  And then it should be just fixed or information about the bug should be saved in bug tracker by projects developer - with all necessary details. I believe it’s the only way to make a bug tracker really work.

Posted by Fyodor Sheremetyev at

redditacct on Bug Tracker Design: Why not design a simple bug tracker around a development mailing list?

I believe there is a git bug tracking tool that was being designed to work via email... but I can’t find it. [link] - discusses same topic...

Excerpt from programming at

The CADT Model

Posted by Sam Ruby at

Add your comment